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It figures I'd be a SCOTTISH shapeshifter . . . - Persephone Yavanna the Entwife

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March 26th, 2005


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04:33 am - It figures I'd be a SCOTTISH shapeshifter . . .
selkie
The Scottish selkie was a being who appeared to be
a seal, but had the ability to shed their skin
and roam the land in human form. If a human
were to happen upon the discarded seal skin, he
or she could hide it and force the selkie to
marry him or her. However, if the selkie were
to ever find the skin, he or she would
immediately reassume seal form and return to
the sea from whence they came, leaving their
spouse and offspring on land to forever mourn
their loss.

As a selkie, you are a very withdrawn, secretive
and somewhat sad person, and those around you
find you alluring and mystifying. People who
come into your life find it difficult to find
the inner you. You are also curious, but you
enjoy the comforts of home most of all.

Who is your inner Shapeshifter?
brought to you by Quizilla

I've always found the idea of selkies (AKA silkies) fascinating, perhaps because I am part Scot myself and they are the archetypal Scots shapeshifter, as the swan-maiden is the Northern European. There was a Childe ballad I used to sing years ago about a silkie -- it was sad, as many ballads are.

An earthly nurse sits and sings,
And aye she sings a lily wean -
"Little ken I my bairn's father,
Far less the land that he dwells in."

For he's come one night to her bed's foot
And a grumbly guest I'm sure he'd be,
Saying, "Here am I, thy bairn's father,
Although I be not comely.

"I am a man upon the land,
I am a silkie in the sea,
And when I'm far and far from land,
My home it is the Sule Skerrie."

And he has ta'en a purse of gold,
And set it softly on her knee,
Saying, "Give to me my little young son
And take thee up thy nurse's fee.

"And I will come one summer's day
When the sun shine's bright on every stane,
I'll come and take my little young son,
And teach him how to swim the faem.

"And ye shall marry a gunner bold,
And a right fine gunner I'm sure he'll be,
And the very first shot that ever he shoots
Will kill both my young son and me."


The song is from the islands off the coast of Scotland -- some sources say the Hebrides, others the Orkneys -- Childe ballad 113, for those who care to research the various versions.
Current Mood: melancholymelancholy
Current Music: "Loch Lomond" -- Emerald Rose
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(Eat a pomegranate)


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